You are currently browsing the Ted Kennedy Watson posts tagged: WestWard


Budding Branches

TPS was busy pruning on Monday which resulted in a stunner of a budding branch. It was so tall it barely fit through the door. It became our lunch & dinner visual entertainment at the table that day. The warmth of the fire and the candles had the buds starting to do their magic. Often, the simplest of things can be the most endearing.



 

 

Spring-y Yellow & Red Tulips

They stopped me in my tracks the moment I spotted them in the Alm Hill Gardens stall at The Market on Saturday morning. I wait for these beauties all year. The bits of red streaking through the vibrant yellow makes my heart sing. They stayed at the shop for the day for all to enjoy, then made the ferry ride over to WestWard to take center stage on the dining table. The majority in a clear glass vessel and three stems just needing to dance in single stem bottles. They made for a happy, happy Sunday supper table.



 

 

Kale In The Country & The Beach

This Flower Friday is not about blooms but a big bunch of kale filling in for the centerpiece of the table. Both at Hawthorne and WestWard, the produce aisle at the grocery store or a quick stop at a roadside farm stand can reap big benefits when it comes to beautiful bundles of greens or herbs. Often times the grocery store flower section will be slim pickings, so I go to plan B. Kale is usually the winner as I love how full and ruffly and rich the greens are–perfect for a showstopper in the middle of the table.



 

 

Beyond Fluttery Yellow Tulips

Flower Friday this week brings us some pretty miraculously beautiful fully blown out ruffly yellow tulips. The snow kept us from getting over to the island for a few weeks. We have some pretty treacherous hills on the way to the house so we opted to not risk it and stayed in town. The house gets quite cold when we are away so the tulips we had left there from our last visit sort of remained in the state they were in when we departed. Tulips love the cool and these most certainly did. The moment we started a fire on arrival, they began their final stretch and dance. They began as tight creamy blooms and ending gloriously yellow ruffled which pleased us both to no end. Have a lovely week-end all! X, TKW



 

 

An Oscar Lunch

This table really has nothing to do with the Oscars, but I did set it for lunch on Sunday in excitement for The Oscars later that night. I just thought calling it ‘An Oscar Lunch’ had a fun ring to it. What got me most excited about setting this table at WestWard were the red striped linen napkins that are new to the shop. They set the tone for the whole table. I chose the tulips with little red streaks in them to compliment the red in the napkins, if ever so subtly. Then red things started getting pulled from the closet and shelves. The hand painted lobster glasses the final touch added that made it all a bit beach-y.



 

 

Open Shelving

I have posted two images this week on Instagram that has garnered quite a few questions. The photos were of some of our kitchen shelves in town as well as out on the island. We prefer our upper shelves to be open, liking the ability to see what things we readily have to pull from. It also keeps us ruthless in our editing because seeing everything makes you super aware of what you need and what you don’t need. Open shelving allows you to grab at will while you are cooking or setting a table. Both of our spaces are not large, so the extra depth of the open cabinet draws your eye even deeper. They instantly make the rooms feel more spacious.



 

 

Stuffed Shells For A Wintery Night

This snowy Wine & Dine Wednesday post is brought to you by my husband, Mr. Sive. Quite often when I post photos of the tables I set, people ask, “But what did you eat?” This is a TPS classic, which he has been making for many years.

A few days ago we had the rare treat of a snowy night at WestWard. This meal was inspired by that, a bottle of hearty red TKW had recently at a tasting, our shared love of all things pasta, and the desire for a homey fireside meal.  

Stuffed shells is a Watson/Sive standby, and this night I wanted a “stick to your ribs” version, with a sauce thick enough to stay with the bits of shell and pasta, and not slip off. There’s a lot going on in this version, with a variety of flavors and a good hearty result.  

Cook a 12oz box of ‘Jumbo Shells’ al dente, and drain in cold water to stop the cooking. Toss them in a bit of EVOO.

While that’s going on, prepare the sauce. Cut up enough carrots, sliced in half and then 1/4 inch thick, for a cup or more total. Pour a few good glugs of EVOO in your favorite dutch oven, heat up and then add the carrots. (We just replaced our Le Creuset, as the old one was beyond lovingly used!) After a minute or two, add 1 medium yellow onion, chopped fairly large. (You want the onions and carrots to still be in chunks after all the cooking and baking.) Sauté until soft and just turning brown. Add about 1 1/2 pounds sweet Italian sausage (or sweet and spicy mixed) and sauté until the sausage is just cooked through. Add 4 cloves of finely minced garlic, and cook a couple minutes longer. Add one 28-ounce can of pureed San Marzano tomatoes, one 6-ounce can of tomato paste, and 1 cup of red wine, and bring to a good simmer. Add a good amount of fresh thyme or oregano (I used the leaves from 8 sprigs), salt and pepper to taste, and leave on a low simmer while you’re assembling other ingredients. Add more wine as needed, but you’ll want a thick sauce.

In a large sauté pan, heat 2 tablespoons each of butter and EVOO to hot. Sauté 24 or so small crimini mushrooms, halved. The mushrooms will absorb all the liquid and start to caramelize. Just as they start to shed liquid, take off the heat and place in a small bowl. (Later, add the liquid that drains from the mushrooms to the tomato sauce).

In another bowl (I utilized the just-used and cooled pasta cooker to save cleaning!) add a 32-ounce container of ricotta cheese, 1 egg, and half of a 5-ounce plastic container of baby arugula, very lightly chopped. Mix just until all the ingredients are evenly distributed. Stuff the shells with the ricotta mixture, about 2 tablespoons in each shell. Don’t worry about being exact!

Now, to assemble. I typically prepare this in two batches, each in a pie sized pan, and freeze one for later cooking, each pan serving four normal people (or slightly fewer hungry Teds). You can certainly make it one large pot. Lightly coat your dish with more EVOO, and add enough sauce to just cover the bottom. Place the shells in one tightly packed layer. Spread the mushrooms evenly, tucking them between the shells. Spread the remaining tomato sauce over the top with a rubber spatula, to tuck it into the nooks and crannies. Lastly, evenly distribute on the top 8-ounces of grated sharp white cheddar. Yes, we’re mixing the English/Irish and the Italian! The zing and creaminess of the cheddar is a great compliment to the hearty tomato and sausage, and contrasts well with the light ricotta.

Bake at 375, covered loosely with foil, for 40ish minutes. You can serve after just a couple minutes of letting it all rest. With those vegetables and protein and cheese and greens, this is a great one-dish meal. Especially for a snowy winter evening…



 

 

A Snowy Sunday Supper

Sunday supper out on the island was extra cozy as the snow paid a visit. In the 20 years that we have had the house, only one other time we were there has it snowed. Seeing the snow fall upon our beloved Colvos Passage is quite something. After the meal we turned off all of the lights and just watched it do its magic. By morning, a good amount accumulated. See below. For the above table, a new vintage find of cobalt French working glasses were called into action to hold oversized tealights. Then it was all about layering layers of blue. The creamy tulips beginning to open ever so beautifully from all heat of the roaring fire, turning more yellow as they opened. TPS made stuffed shells, one of my all-time favorite comfort dishes he makes. Perfect for eve as the snow fell.



 

 

Ted’s Tip No. 186

Setting a creative table can be as easy as just choosing a theme and running with it. Or in this case, swimming with it. Keep in mind too, dishtowels can make swell placements in a pinch.



 

 

The Tale of Two Bread Puddings

Wine & Dine Wednesday is the tale of the beginning adventures into my foray with making bread pudding. The above made at Hawthorne a few weeks ago, with the below made at WestWard on Sunday. I show you both because it shows you how versatile this dish is. I almost typed ‘dessert’ but I know many folks like having this for breakfast with syrup, and to that I say, right on!

Using stale bread product is best as that helps it stand up to the custard mixture you will be making and adding. I say bread product because croissants are fab for this, as is panettone., which I used for the one this week-end. You really can add just about anything you want to make it extra special. The first one I used a baguette, Grand Marnier, walnuts & chocolate chips. The other day I used panettone we sell at the shop, raisins & chocolate chips. Here is the basic recipe. Make it your own by switching it up adding additional ingredients.

In a baking dish tear up or cube the bread product that will be your base. Set aside.

In a bowl break in 6 eggs, then add 3 cups of whole milk, a cup of white sugar, along with 2 teaspoons each of ground cinnamon and vanilla extract. Whisk all together then pour glorious custard mixture over the waiting torn up bread. You want to make sure that the majority of the bread is submerged by the liquid. Let sit for a bit to let it soak in all that goodness. Then bake at 350 degrees for 45 minutes.

To gild the lily, serve with caramel sauce once it is out of the oven and cooled a bit. Or not. But I promise you will be happy you did…