You are currently browsing the Ted Kennedy Watson posts tagged: Wine & Dine Wednesday


Forty Ounce Rosé

There were so many things about this bottle that intrigued me, I am not even sure where to begin. Wine & Dine Wednesday is a pretty fab rosé that is a heck of a deal in a super unique bottle. It is also called ‘Forty Ounce Rosé’ but in truth, it is close to 34 ounces. Go figure. But it had that light blush color that I am always after when it comes to rosé, and it is French, another top of the list prerequisite most times. The bottle absolutely got my attention. Kind of like a bottle for extra virgin olive oil or inexpensive beer. You decide. The wine was fresh & succulent and easily drinkable, as any rosé should be. At under 20 bucks it was a major winner. Officially we still have 3 weeks left of Summer and we plan on grabbing every bit of it. If a glass of rosé is involved, all the better.



 

 

Summer Corn, Bean and Tomato Salad

My husband has been making this Summmmaaaa time salad for as long as I can remember and I adore it as it works really well with so many things. The flavors speak of the season. Take it away Mister Sive on this Wine & Dine Wednesday post shot at WestWard and written at Hawthorne where he is making this again tomorrow eve for visiting family.

This is a stalwart on the Watson Sive household menu: a fine accompaniment to barbeque chicken, a hearty and easy-to-travel picnic, and a happy leftover. This dish couldn’t be simpler. Review the components in the first picture. Prepare each separately. Mix! I’ve noted the portions I use, but always do to your liking.

A few hours beforehand, mince a ½ cup of red onion, cover with your favorite vinegar, and pickle to mellow the onion.

Lightly cook 5 cobs of corn and cut off the kernels.

Remove the seeds and juice and medium chop about 2 cups of tomatoes.

Remove the seeds and medium chop 1 large cucumber.

Julienne ½ cup of Italian parsley (or cilantro if you want a bit more zip!)

Drain 2 cans of black beans.

Add together in a bowl, pour over some EVOO, and mix lightly. This is great both cold or room temperature.



 

 

A Drinks Tray

This Wine & Dine Wednesday is about assembling a drinks tray. This one is for outside dining, but works pretty much the same when the party/gathering is inside too. Entertaining can and should be tons of fun. But it can be quite a bit of work, as well, and I think that is what stops or hinders folks from doing it. A drinks tray makes things waaaaaay easier. At WestWard, the tray sits right on the bench next to the dining table and by the chairs where we sit when guests first arrive. It is also next to the staircase that leads to the beach, making it easy to make a libation for your beach walk. I add whatever the offerings are for the day. Negronis and Aperol spritz were on the menu for above, as well as sparking water and club soda. Our friend Bill drinks Bourbon and 7UP so that assortment was on the tray too. Plus we always include G&T fixings, as they speak of Summer. Add a bucket of ice, glasses and citrus needed for the drinks. Not in the photo but added later a sharp knife to cut the citrus and a spoon to stir. By having it right where the gathering is taking place you are not constantly running into the kitchen or bar area to mix drinks. Plus it makes it easy for guests to make their own if they would like when you get busy putting together the meal. A drinks tray speaks of a party! Your guests will feel cared for and it makes things so much easier for the host.



 

 

Nick’s on Madison

Wine & Dine Wednesday brings us a new Seattle restaurant, Nick’s on Madison. The above pan seared Alaskan halibut, black rice, bunapi mushrooms, radish and green curry sauce was my dinner last Friday eve. It was heavenly! We got together with our good friends Jackie & Mark. We have had a bunch of meals out of late, but I have not felt compelled to write about them. Sticking with my ‘if you don’t have something nice to say’ policy when it comes most things, but always applies to restaurants, and I have not felt moved. The food biz is one tough business, so I prefer to only feature those places we loved. This would be one such place. The moment we entered the space, it just felt good. It has a great open layout, and you instantly feel happy when you arrive. It hits the mark of being casual but you could also be dressed up and feel equally comfortable. It has a neighborhood vibe, which we always enjoy. Situated in Madison Valley, it pulls from lots of swell neighborhoods. We ran into several folks we know, which always makes the experience neighborly. Fun, creative artwork fills the walls. The service is lovely and the bar sits front and center which creates a fab energy. The menu is varied which we always like, so you can have a yummy burger right on up to a dish like the halibut I so thoroughly enjoyed. Nick Yockey, the owner, is the husband to Jackie’s niece, Ryan. She just so happens to have a women’s clothing & gift shop right next door. They are keeping it all in the family! Coming from managing restaurants, this is his first solo venture. What I love about independently owned places, be it a retail shop or restaurant, is the owner often is there. You feel cared for. The establishment becomes an extension of who they are. Nick is one heck of a nice guy, and that is reflected in his restaurant. We will go back again and again. If you see us, please say hi! Click here for the website with the address and hours. Tell Nick ‘The Teds’ sent you.



 

 

Upside Down Coffee Cake

This Wine & Dine Wednesday is Mister Sive walking you through his crazy yummy coffee cake. Above is a blueberry version he made a few weeks ago. Below a cherry concoction he made the other evening, which we have been enjoying since. Morning, noon or night, this coffee cake is sure to please. Take it away TPS!

My mother encouraged us kids to cook from a very young age.  I remember the first “adult” dish I cooked was a paella, I think in 7th grade, and in high school I cooked one dinner a week. Like many households in the 70’s, The Joy of Cooking was a key reference, and inspired the following recipe. Ted and I have Mom’s old copy, with her notes on the sides of which of us five kids liked which dishes. I’m not sure, though, that Mom would approve of the importance of Breakfast Dessert in the Watson Sive Household… Maybe I’m old enough now to ask her on my next visit.

This coffee cake uses a pastry dough and has a marvelous caramelized top. I bake it in a 9” springform pan, which makes the flipping-over-after-baking-and-keeping-it-all-together a bit easier. 

Grease that pan with a good 2 tablespoons of butter, to be sure the cake slips out easily. Mix together ½ cup lightly chopped walnuts and ½ cup dark brown sugar and spread evenly in the bottom of the pan. Set aside.

For the dough, stir with a fork: 2 ¼ cup flour, 1 cup of white sugar, 2 tablespoons of baking powder, a tiny pinch of salt, and ¾ teaspoon ground nutmeg. Then, cut 1 stick (8 tablespoons) of cold butter into ¼ inch cubes, and cut into the flour mixture. Everyone has their own favorite method; mine is with a quick, light touch by fingers. As always with pastry dough, less is more.

Whisk together: 1 whole egg and 1 egg white, ¾ cup of whole milk, and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Pour this over the pastry mixture, and stir lightly, maybe ½ way to fully mixed. Then, add 2 cups of fruit in small bite sizes (perhaps whole blueberries, half cherries, or cubed peaches) and lightly fold, until just mixed.

Spoon the wet dough over the sugar and nuts, and spread evenly. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 55 minutes, until it springs back when touched and a toothpick comes out clean.  

Transfer to a cooling rack, run a knife along the side, and immediately release the side of the springform pan. Let cool a few minutes, and then carefully flip the cake and peel off the bottom layer of the pan. 

Serve while warm and you’ll be someone’s favorite person for the day.

 

 

 



 

 

Olive Oil Oven Roasted Asparagus

Asparagus season is a treat I look forward to all year. We eat asparagus pretty much year round, but most often than not, they are quite thin spears. When the fresh chunky spears start arriving, then I get excited! This Wine & Dine Wednesday post is how to prepare it super simply in the oven.

Oven to 375 while you prepare the asparagus. For thin I never peel them. For the thick, pretty much always, as the lower portion can be quite woody. Plus, that is how the French do it, so that is always reason enough for me. Insert big grateful smile. With a vegetable peeler take off a layer starting at the half way point to the bottom. I then like to cut the bottom at an angle because I like the way it looks. Thanks Ina! Then a lovely layer of the best extra virgin olive oil you can get you hands on. Finally a dusting of sea salt. Then into the hot oven for 10 minutes. Start poking with your finger. You want give but not soft. Could take up to 15 to 20 minutes depending of thickness and to your liking. Then eat, eat, eat and enjoy, enjoy, enjoy.



 

 

Adelsheim Pinot Gris 2017

Wine & Dine Wednesday is about a stellar wine as well as a yummy salad to go with it. A combo! First off, a lovely Adelsheim Pinot Gris. Going to college in Oregon, Adelsheim is a winery I have long admired, always regarded as creating top-flight wines. I was looking for a white to go with the salad I was making to go alongside a piece of halibut. The bottle all but jumped off the shelf at me. It was like visiting an old friend. Layers of interesting complexity and just as special as you had remembered. It was pretty perfect with the salad and fish.

From the maker: Crisp, bright flavors have always been the hallmark of Adelsheim Pinot gris. In this 2017, you’ll find aromas of white peach, minerality, and pear blossom. It pulls off the difficult feat of providing a gentle creaminess that lends a rich, mouth-filling texture and long finish, yet is still impressing as a wine that’s crisp and clean.

For the salad greens, baby arugula was the winner. As well as a simple balsamic vinaigrette–using a quarter of a cup of really good balsamic vinegar, a big dollop of Dijon, salt & pepper, then whisk in a half of a cup of extra virgin olive oil. Cube up small bite sized pieces of watermelon. Crumble feta over the salad. Gently mix all together. Enjoy!

OK, need your help on this if you know of a fix. You might have noticed in the last few months some of the photos are showing up sideways or stretched weird on the blog posts. Not often, but every once in awhile. I have absolutely no idea why and I don’t know how to remedy it. I have done a bit of research on it and am coming up dry. I use the WordPress platform for the blog, and have since day one. I really love it. Initially you could manipulate images with sizing yourself but awhile back that option went away. Not sure if a recent update has caused the problem. If anyone is aware of a fix, let me know. Huge THANKS. X, Ted



 

 

Herbed Chèvre & Fresh Corn Frittata

I have written about the ease and flexibility of making frittatas a bunch in the past, but a few I made recently with fresh corn seemed timely so they grab a spot on a Wine & Dine Wednesday post.

Both in Seattle and Ghent, we have had some awesome corn on the cob this past month. Often we will have an ear left over so this is where it comes in super handy. Using up what we have in the fridge before we head back to one place or another is always part of my plan. Last Thursday night we had a piece of herbed chèvre in the fridge and eggs in the egg trays. Along with a piece of baguette, some salad greens and a glass of wine and dinner was served.

Crack 5 eggs into a bowl, add a splash of milk, along with a few pinches of salt & pepper. Whisk. In a non-stick pan add a bit of butter to coat. Over low heat add the egg mixture. Before it has set, add the corn kernels you have cut off the cob, scattering then around the eggs. Same with the herbed chèvre that you break apart and dot pieces here and there. The eggs should still be undercooked in the middle but the sides have just begun to set. Take the pan and put it under a broiler. Do not walk away as you want to stay with this to the end. The frittata will start to puff up from the intense heat. Just what you are wanting! Make sure you have on an oven mitt as you move the pan around a bit so it cooks evenly. Once the eggs have fully set, you are ready to dine. We enjoy these equally for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Super versatile. Enjoy!



 

 

Château du Cèdre Marcel Malbec

This Wine & Dine Wednesday is a yummy red we had the other evening with a tasty filet mignon & scallops I made for Sunday supper out on the island. Full disclosure, I was absolutely smitten with the label! I was rushing around the grocery store and it was my last purchase before heading to the checkout line. Was completely taken by the images and fonts. Good news, what was in the bottle was every bit as good as what was on the outside. At under 15 bucks a bottle, we would try it again and again.

A little history and wine speak: Pascal Verhaeghe and his brother, Jean-Marc, bring a welcome refinement to the wines of picturesque Cahors, located about an hour and a half east of Bordeaux. Their father began making wines at Château du Cèdre in the 1970s, and the fun-loving sons took over in the 1990s, banning all herbicides and chemicals, and adopting a domaine motto: “Move forward, experience new ways.”

Fragrant & tasty on the palate with damson plum and blackberry fruit. Full, fresh, and engaging, this Malbec is a hidden gem and the fruit is super clean!



 

 

Shrimp, English Peas & Mint Risotto

The rock shrimp are what caught my eye, getting my mind spinning on what risotto to make out on the island the other eve. I knew I wanted to make risotto but waited to get to the grocery store for inspiration. They also had some biggy big shrimp that looked swell so I got a few of those to roast up to add to the top of the dish. English peas in the organic section in the shell made me happy as all get out and our pot of mint from last year was already overflowing. Done! I was off and running.

I wrote about risotto in my book. My idea for all of us non-professional home cooks is to master a few handful of things, then we can mix up ingredients to make tons & tons of tasty things. Risotto falls into that category. Get the basics down and you can make a zillion versions of it. Roast the big shrimp in the oven to add to the top at the end. I also roasted the rock shrimp for just a few minutes in the oven on a sheet pan. They will continue to cook when you add them to the hot risotto towards the end. The same is true for the bag of frozen peas. They will cook from the heat of the rice. The English peas I added raw to the top of the dish at the very end for a little crunch. They are little nature’s candy. Lastly I tore bits of mint and scattered it about the whole thing at the end. Here is my go-to recipe below.

Heat up the 8 cups of stock to not quite a boil, then turn down the heat a bit, but the stock should remain hot thru the entire risotto cooking process. Next, and here is where I like to use a good sized Le Creuset pot for cooking the risotto in, add a liberal dose of butter and cook a diced onion and shallot till they are not quite brown. Then add a good amount of olive oil to that, along with 2 cups of Arborio rice. Coat the rice with the butter and oil mixture, and sauté for a minute or two to cook through, but don’t brown the rice. All of the above is done over medium heat, but stove tops vary greatly, so adjust accordingly.

Now the liquids begin. Add one cup of white wine to the mixture. I like to use a white that we will be serving with the meal. Stir rice till the wine is absorbed. The depth of flavor the wine adds to the finished product is really noticeable.

Now the waiting hot stock takes center stage. Add one cup of stock to the mixture, stirring till the stock is fully absorbed. What holds many folks back about making risotto is there is a good amount of stirring involved. A constant stir is not necessary, but pretty close. This is where the white wine you opened comes in quite nicely. Sipping a little white wine during the risotto making process is a personal favorite–it is my break from stirring. Continue adding the hot stock one cup at a time, and the rice will become creamier as you go, as it releases the natural starches. Add the 7th cup of stock. Add the almost cooked through rock shrimp to the mixture. At this point, you will be about 20 to 25 minutes into the rice cooking process. You are almost there.

Now add the bag of peas. It does not need to be completely unfrozen as the peas will defrost the moment they hit the hot rice. Stir. Add a cup of freshly grated Parmesan cheese. Stir. Turn off the heat. Add another cup of stock. Stir. Add a dusting of salt & fresh ground black pepper. Stir. Put on the lid. Let sit for 5 minutes, have another sip of your white wine, as we are almost done. Once that 5 minutes has passed, give it one last stir, adding a bit more stock so it is nice and creamy. In a bowl add the risotto mixture, then add the large shrimp to each bowl and finally a few sprinkles of the grated Parmesan along with the English peas and a scattering of the fresh mint. A bit of work, but that will all fade away when you have your first bite. Happy Spring!